Best Running Shoes for High Arches in 2018 Nov.

Updated and medically verified by Patricia Nolan. Last updated on Aug 23, 2018.

The condition of having high arches is not that uncommon. It can be either an inherited condition or can arise from hosting other medical problems. The problem users face when suffering from high arch conditions is placing increased pressures on the heel of the foot and the toes. These increased amounts of pressures can lead to greater injury risks and can cause for the development of additional conditions. For the runner, there are some options of saving grace for having higher arches.

Below is a detailed look into the high arch condition and a guide for features you should be looking for in suitable footwear options. We will also provide 5 selections of shoes that will work best for this condition, keeping you on track with your running habits.

5 Best Running Shoes for High Arches

Rating

Product

Price

My Rating

EDITOR'S CHOICE

Adidas Performance Women's Pureboost Xpose Running Shoe

BEST VALUE

New Balance Men's MT410V4 Trail-Running Shoe

3.

Nike Women's Flex Trainer 5 Shoe

4.

ASICS Men's Gel-Nimbus 19 Running Shoe

5.

Nike Women's Shox Junior Running Shoe


5 Best Running Shoes for High Arches (Review)

Adidas Performance Women's Pureboost Xpose Running Shoe

Our first submission coming from Adidas takes an adverse approach to applying midsole support for high arches. The Pureboost Xpose running shoe makes for a visually appealing component into arch support. The midsole is removed and features a strong-holding curvature that applies the necessary cushion and pressure to the arch of the foot. Normally, shoes feature this technology within the build, but Adidas exposes this feature, allowing the user to see exactly where the support elements are extending from. This feature is also placed on top of additional cushions in the outsole, creating a dual force of support in all the right areas.

Aside from the great amount of arch support, the shoe features elements of rubberized materials that are stacked to create the outsole of the shoe. These materials are layered to produce a thick support element that directly benefits the heel and the toes. It is comprised of synthetic and textile materials, keeping it in the lightweight space. The outsole features extended cushions that respond to your movements, directly reducing pressures and strains when you push-off or land.

PROS

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    Dual force in favor of arch support
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    Responsive outsole helps your foot remained cushioned and supported during movement
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    Lightweight material makeup
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    Forms to your arch; perfect fit for high arch users

CONS

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    Free-standing materials allow for easier breakdown

New Balance Men's MT410V4 Trail-Running Shoe

Sticking with the trail running fashion, New Balance submits their MT410V4 trail runners to the high arch discussion. The midsole of this shoe features a cut-out portion of the undercarriage. This creates a space in this area, which calls for a focus on the heel and the toes. This is the proper design for a high arch user. The design is met with functionality due to the reinforced, rubberized materials that make up the outsole. The undercarriage also hosts an increased number of extended mechanisms for holding and increased grips during your run. The reinforced materials and extended grippers create for a 3-layer protection against pressures and foot wear and tear.

The shoe is comprised of synthetic materials. These materials are layered and reinforced to bring solid construction to the outer shell of the shoe. The interior is lined with padded materials, helping with the stability and holding measures needed for complete strides and proper movements.

PROS

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    Strengthened material make up
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    Proper hike in the midsole
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    3 layers of protection and support in the rubber sole

CONS

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    Bulky shoe; not a lightweight option

Nike Women's Flex Trainer 5 Shoe

While training shoes reside more comfortably in the treadmill running space, the Nike Flex Trainer 5 provides support elements and traction items to host success in outdoor running environments. This shoe includes the use of pylon materials in the midsole, to relieve the pressure in this area. This construction also allows for an increased amount of cushioning in the midsole area. The spacing in the undercarriage takes the proper form for a high arch user, with a slight incline being placed in the middle of the shoe.

The shoe is supported by rubberized materials. These materials are stacked in two layers, increasing the amount of support you desire in the ankle, heel, and foot areas. The backing of the shoe is reinforced with extended padding that surrounds the ankle. This keeps the foot sturdy within the shoe and limits the lateral movements extended from the ankle area. It is also constructed from mesh and synthetic materials giving it a lightweight title.

PROS

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    Plyon inclusion for cushioned midsole support and comfort
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    Even distribution in elements on the undercarriage
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    Stacked rubber base for extra support in key areas

CONS

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    Midsole only rises at a small angle; minimal rise

ASICS Men's Gel-Nimbus 19 Running Shoe

Introducing gel-like support measures is a staple of the ASICS Gel-Nimbus 19 running shoe. Starting at the backing of the shoe, there is an incredible amount of support mechanisms at work. This reinforcement starts with a rubberized outsole base, layers it with a cushioned rubber pattern, and introduces the gel into the heel box of the shoe. The introduction of the gel-like material helps relieve pressures on the heel and ankle and reduces the amount of shock affecting the foot during your run.

The midsole is also arched to keep a supportive base for the high arch user. It hikes into the interior of the shoe, form-fitting your arch and applying a light pressure to this area. The interior is also equipped with a proprietary make-up of the gel-like substance. This material runs throughout the entire insole, providing cushioning to all areas of the foot.

PROS

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    Infusion of gel-like materials for support measures and shock absorbent capabilities
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    Protruding midsole that caters to the high arches
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    Stability in the heel box with the inclusion of layered padding and support

CONS

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    Only covers about half of the ankle
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    Smaller toe box area

Nike Women's Shox Junior Running Shoe

One of the most unique and absorbent shoes that Nike has ever created extends from their Shox product line. These shoes introduce four extended pillars that compress pressures on the undercarriage of the shoe. Each time you push-off or land on the ground, the function of these shock-absorbers will take shape. It will lower the blow on the back of the heel and ankle area, increasing stability and support in these areas. The front of the shoe keeps your toes closer to the ground and allows for the proper amount of flex for high arch users.

Speaking to the midsole, this shoe helps push this area up into the interior on a curved hike. It helps surround your pronounced arch, providing a cushioning and padding technique that helps stabilize this space. This shoe is made solely from synthetic materials, meaning it does well to host success for those who enjoy lightweight shoes.

PROS

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    Implementation of shock-absorbent pillars on the bottom of the shoe
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    Proper spacing and rise in the midsole
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    Even distribution of padding and support on the undercarriage of the shoe

CONS

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    Rests solely in the high-end space

High Arch Background to Target

The main issue surrounding high arches is applied pressure points. These points are located in different areas for different feet types, which often causes for the need for customized orthotics to completely form to your unique condition. While this practice isn't cost effective, it does cater to your needs in a complete fashion. Below is a brief video detailing certain pressure points and areas of focus for users who have high arches:

From the video alone, we find that high arch treatment is best handled on a prescription basis. For those who cannot afford these means or process, we have additional solutions for things to look for in shoes that meet high arch needs. Below is a guide to assist you in the selection process and better direct your areas of focus in running footwear needs.

Supportive Midsole

One of the most important areas in finding the correct footwear for having high arches is the midsole. It represents an area of support that needs to introduce means for reducing the pressures placed on your heels and toes. Having a high arch is a partner piece to increase the pressure placed on these areas, so a happy medium is a good starting point. This feature is pronounced via the inclusion of a visible hike in the middle of the shoe. The outsole with feature a cut out or a small arch in the middle of the undercarriage portion. This creates for an even distribution of weight throughout the entire foot, limiting the individual amounts of pressure placed on the high traffic areas described above.

The midsole should also offer some sort of cushion on the interior or a lift element. This element can surround the high arch and cause for it to be in contact with the foot throughout the movement or running strides. This is an important feature because we want to cater to the condition, but not reduce the support given to the other areas of the shoe. Start with a pronounced midrise or midsole area and work your way to other portions of the shoe.

Keeping the Ankle In-Check

When we draw our attention to the bottom of the foot, we often leave the ankle out of the discussion. The ankle acts as a housing unit for holding operation measures and performance delivery to the other areas of the foot, marking it a very important element to target. Proper footing measures and placement holders are necessary to keep the ankle stable and prevent it from sliding around in the shoes.

If the ankle receives any action of discourse or adversity, it can relate to the furthering of problems with the bottom of the foot. Therefore, it is important to take this source area and ensure it is kept in the proper form and with the proper tightness. You want a snug fit, but not too tight to cut off any measures of circulation.

Front and Back Undercarriage Support

Due to the high focus being expended in the previously described areas, it is often easy to ignore the front and back of the undercarriage. The main area of focus remains in the midsole, but it is important to host elements that benefit the two primary areas of push-off and landing during the act of running: the heel and the toes.

Depending on the length of your strides, you will often sway towards using one of these foot areas more than the other. Hosting increased padding and protection in the rubber or foam outsole is a target area for users who have high arches. If your strides are short, you rely more heavily on your toes than your heels. If your strides are long and pronounced, the heel portion is of greater concern. When you have high arches, you rely on these areas more heavily than those with a normal foot, increasing the need for additional padding and build-up in these areas of the shoe.

One additional protection measure is footwear that includes some sort of shock absorbent technology. Your step and push-off are heavier in the heel and toes when you have high arches. You need to rely on these areas to expand on the use of increased amounts of body weight and pressure. Adding shock absorbent materials will lessen the blow to these areas and can keep your strides on pace during a run.

Conclusion

After looking through the prescribed product briefings, it is hard to argue with the technology introduced by the Adidas Pureboost Xpose running shoes. The implementation of the pronounced hike and curve in the midsole is an incredible feature for the user. This idea caters directly to the high arch marketplace, providing the user with a technology they can view from the exterior. The support measures don't stop at this technology, introducing additional padding underneath this midsole.

The padding also extends and thickens at the heel and toe area, which are major target areas for high arch users. The dual function of the forces in the midsole is too juicy for the high arch user to ignore. The other options also provide solid companions to the high arch users. The shoe should house some sort of visual recognition of midsole technology. A shoe without a hike or arch in this area will cause problems for the high arch user.


Sources
  1. Marathon Training Academy: Runners with High Arches
  2. Foot Health Facts: Cavus Foot (High-Arched Foot)
  3. Runner's World: Can Arch Height Predict Your Running Injuries?
Patricia Nolan

Patricia is a podiatrist (foot and ankle specialist) practicing in Pennsylvania Hospital. Dr. Nolan completed her undergraduate education at Temple University, Podiatric Medicine , and went on to the New York University of Podiatric Medicine to continue her medical training. She is board-certified in Emergency and Podiatric Medicine. Her biggest expertise is foot and sport injuries. She is a big fan of running; furthermore, she’s an expert in choosing the proper footwear and shoes for running and other sports. Linkedin , Twitter

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